Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning

We have come to see the Holocaust as a factory of death organised by bureaucrats. Yet by the time the gas chambers became operation more than a million European Jews were already dead: shot at close range over pits and ravines. They had been murdered in the lawless killing zones created by the German colonial […]

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Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning

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We have come to see the Holocaust as a factory of death organised by bureaucrats. Yet by the time the gas chambers became operation more than a million European Jews were already dead: shot at close range over pits and ravines. They had been murdered in the lawless killing zones created by the German colonial war in the East many on the fertile black earth that the Nazis believed would feed the...

We have come to see the Holocaust as a factory of death organised by bureaucrats. Yet by the time the gas chambers became operation more than a million European Jews were already dead: shot at close range over pits and ravines. They had been murdered in the lawless killing zones created by the German colonial war in the East many on the fertile black earth that the Nazis believed would feed the German people. It comforts us to believe that the Holocaust was a unique event. But as Timothy Snyder shows we have missed basic lessons of the history of the Holocaust and some of our beliefs are frighteningly close to the ecological panic that Hitler expressed in the 1920s. As ideological and environmental challenges to the world order mount our societies might be more vulnerable than we would like to think. Timothy Snyder’s Bloodlands was an acclaimed exploration of what happened in eastern Europe between 1933 and 1945 when Nazi and Soviet policy brought death to some 14 million people. Black Earth is a deep exploration of the ideas and politics that enabled the worst of these policies the Nazi extermination of the Jews. Its pioneering treatment of this unprecedented crime makes the Holocaust intelligible and thus all the more terrifying. Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He received his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1997 where he was a British Marshall Scholar. Before joining the faculty at Yale in 2001 he held fellowships in Paris Vienna and Warsaw and an Academy Scholarship at Harvard. He has spent some ten years in Europe and speaks five and reads ten European languages. Among his publications are several award-winning books all of which have been translated: Nationalism Marxism and Modern Central Europe: A Biography of Kazimierz Kelles-Krauz (1998 revised edition 2016) The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland Ukraine Lithuania Belarus 1569-1999 (2003) Sketches from a Secret War: A Polish Artist’s Mission to Liberate Soviet Ukraine (2005) The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of a Habsburg Archduke (2008) and Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin (2010). Bloodlands won twelve awards including the Emerson Prize in the Humanities a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters the Leipzig Award for European Understanding and the Hannah Arendt Prize in Political Thought. It has been translated into more than thirty languages was named to twelve book-of-the-year lists and was a bestseller in six countries. His forthcoming book Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning will be published by Crown Books in September 2015 and in twenty-one foreign editions thereafter. Snyder is also the co-editor of Wall Around the West: State Borders and Immigration Controls in Europe and North America (2001) and Stalin and Europe: Terror War Domination (2013). He helped Tony Judt to compose a thematic history of political ideas and intellectuals in politics Thinking the Twentieth Century (2012). Some of Snyder’s essays on the Ukrainian revolution were published in in Russian and Ukrainian as Ukrainian History Russian Politics European Futures (2014). Other essays will be published in Czech as The Politics of Life and Death (2015). Snyder sits on the editorial boards of the Journal of Modern European History and East European Politics and Societies. His scholarly articles have appeared in Past and Present the Journal of Cold War Studies and other journals he has also written for The New York Review of Books Foreign Affairs The Times Literary Supplement The Nation and The New Republic as well as for The New York Times The International Herald Tribune The Wall Street Journal and other newspapers. Snyder was the recipient of an inaugural Andrew Carnegie Fellowship in 2015. He is a member of the Committee on Conscience of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and sits on the advisory councils of the Yivo Institute for Jewish Research and other organizations.

Autor: Timothy Snyder
Editura: Vintage